Alumni Insight: 10 Questions with School of Nursing Graduate Judi Brown

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Name: Judi Hollern Brown

Year of graduation from Mount Carmel School of Nursing: 1974

Current hometown: Dublin, Ohio

Professional highlights: BSN, RN

When did you first feel the call to be a nurse? When I was a junior in high school.

What television show do you have to DVR every week? “NCIS” – Mark Harmon is easy on the eyes! Also, “Person of Interest.”

What is your favorite memory of Mount Carmel? I have lots of great memories of Mount Carmel, including the lasting friendships, difficult studies and dorm life. We had no cell phones then, but one phone on each hall. I remember not signing out with Elestine (the house mother), leaving and sneaking back in through the ER, and hoping I wouldn’t get caught (yes, we had curfews).

How has your Mount Carmel network helped you in your life, personally or professionally or both? Mount Carmel shares my philosophy. I was taught the core values and skills to practice in the clinical setting, and that foundation has served me well. Mount Carmel is known for its strong academics and also the clinical experiences that position each graduate to succeed. The program also taught me discipline and how to prioritize, and manage my time, which has carried over both personally and professionally.

What book is currently on your nightstand (or at the top of your Kindle favorites)? Mother Love. I was given this when I had my first child (I actually later bought a new book, because my original was quite worn). The book contains daily reflections and prayers. I find the readings inspirational, as they deal with the challenges of motherhood.

What advice would you like to share with other nurses as they move from student to alumni of Mount Carmel? First of all, try and join the Mount Carmel Alumni Association. Many scholarships are given to current students, and without the help of the alumni these would not be made possible. Be kind to your peers and colleagues. Agree to disagree, but do it respectfully. Look at learning as a lifelong adventure, whether in the classroom setting or on a personal basis. Remember on those days that you go home frustrated after having a difficult day: you do make a difference in your patients’ and families’ lives.

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